Kinematics And Dynamics Of Particles And Rigid Bodies Pdf Writer

Kinematics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies pdf writer

EN4: Dynamics and Vibrations. A rigid body is an idealization of a body that does not deform or change shape. Formally it is defined as a collection of particles with the property that the distance between particles remains unchanged during the course of motions of the body. Like the approximation of a rigid body as a particle, this is never strictly true. All bodies deform as they move.

However, the approximation remains acceptable as long as the deformations are negligible relative to the overall motion of the body. Figure 5. As an example, the flutter of an aircraft wing during the course of a flight is clearly negligible relative to the motion of the aircraft as a whole.

On the other hand, if one was interested in stresses induced in the wing as a consequence of the flutter, these deformations become of primary importance. In the following, we will restrict attention to the planar motion of rigid bodies.

Kinematics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies pdf writer

In particular, we will take all rigid bodies to be thin slabs with motion constrained to lie within the plane of the slab. In the following we will derive expressions that describe the general motion of a rigid body in the plane. As rigid bodies are viewed as collections of particles, this may appear an insurmountable task, requiring a description of the motion of each particle.

However, the assumption that the body does not deform is a very strong one, requiring that the distance between every pair of particles comprising the body remains unchanged. To satisfy this, the particles that comprise a rigid body must move in concert, making the kinematics almost trivial. Before we can proceed to this, however, we need to be able to analyze motion relative to a set of translating axes. In the course so far particle motion has been described using position vectors that were referred to fixed reference frames.

The positions, velocities and accelerations determined in this way are referred to as absolute. Many problems are simplified considerably by the use of a moving reference frame. In the following we will restrict our attention to moving reference frames that translate but do not rotate.

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Consider two particles A and B moving along independent trajectories in the plane, and a fixed reference O.

Let and be the positions of particles A and B in the fixed reference. Instead of observing the motion of particle A relative to the fixed reference as we have done in the past, we will attach a non-rotating reference to particle B and observe the motion of A relative to the moving reference at B. Let i and j be basis vectors of the moving reference, then the position vector of A relative to the reference at B , denoted is,. Observe that, as the moving frame does not rotate, basis vectors i and j do not change in time.

Therefore, taking time derivatives, we obtain simply,. Now we can express the absolute position vector of A as,. Differentiating the equation in time to obtain expressions for the absolute velocity and acceleration of particle A :.

Kinematics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies pdf writer

The relative terms are the velocity or acceleration measured by an observer attached to the moving reference at particle B. In the following, we identify two properties of the motion of rigid bodies that simplify the kinematics significantly. In order to do this, observe that an arbitrary rigid body motion falls into one of the three categories:.

We proceed by demonstrating that every motion of a planar rigid body is associated with a single angular velocity and angular acceleration , describing the angular displacement of an arbitrary line inscribed in the body relative to a fixed direction.

Kinematics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies pdf writer

Consider a rigid body undergoing plane motion. The angular positions of two arbitrary lines 1 and 2 attached to the body are specified by and measured relative to any convenient fixed reference direction. These are related to the intermediate angle shown as,. Observe that as the body is rigid, requiring that the distance between each pair of points on the two lines 1 and 2 is constant, angle must be invariant.

Differentiating the relation above with this in mind,.

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These hold for arbitrary lines attached to the body, implying in turn that the body can be associated with a unique angular velocity , defined as,. Arguing analogously, the body can be associated with a unique angular acceleration defined as,. Consequently, we have the property that all lines on a rigid body in its plane of motion have the same angular displacement, the same angular velocity and the same angular acceleration.

Next, consider the motion of a rigid body over the interval as shown, with arbitrary point taken as reference. Clearly, the motion can be consider to occur in two stages: a translation with reference taking arbitrary line to an intermediate position ; and a rotation about point taking to its final position.

This corresponds to a decomposition of the motion into the sum of a translation and a rotation. While the translational motion is described by the velocity and acceleration of the reference point, the rotational motion is characterized by the unique angular velocity and angular acceleration associated with the body. Thus, we have the property that the motion of a rigid body can be decomposed into a translation of an arbitrary point within the body, followed by a rigid rotation of the body about this point.

Further, the motion of an arbitrary point within the body is determined completely once the translational quantities and , and rotational quantities and are known. With this understanding of the structure of plane motion of rigid bodies, we are in a position to move onto the business of attempting to derive equations that describe the motion.

Consider a rigid body moving in the plane with angular velocity and angular acceleration , and two arbitrary points A and B of the body. We will examine the motion of this body in both, the fixed reference O shown, as well as relative to a non-rotating reference attached to point B.

Introduction to Kinematics of Rigid Bodies - Kinematics of Rigid Bodies - Engineering Mechanics

Proceeding, we express the absolute position of point A in terms of the absolute position of point B as,. An analogous expression for absolute velocities follows by taking time derivatives,. Now, as the body moves, point A traces a circular path of radius relative to point B , keeping the distance between the two unchanged.

The angular velocity of this motion is simply the angular velocity of the rigid body. Then, using results derived previously for the time derivatives of rotating vectors we have:.

Observe that the expression reflects the decomposition of rigid body motion referred to previously. With B chosen as reference, the velocity of A is the vector sum of a translational portion and a rotational portion. Proceeding to derive expressions for the acceleration of an arbitrary point of a rigid body, we differentiate the equation for velocities to obtain,. Thus, like the absolute velocity, the absolute acceleration of point A is the vector sum of a translational portion and a rotational portion.

Kinematics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies pdf writer

In the following we will apply the kinematical relations derived to the case of a rigid body rotating about a fixed axis. As will be seen, the relations will reduce to familiar forms once n-t coordinates are introduced. Consider an arbitrary point A of a rigid body rotating with angular velocity and angular acceleration about axis O. Let and be unit vectors tethered to point A as shown, with tangent and normal to the path of A.

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Then, using the kinematical relations for general rigid motion with axis O taken as reference, we obtain expressions for the velocity and acceleration of point A:. Now, as the motion is planar, the angular velocity and angular acceleration have the form,.

To help develop some intuition, we turn to examine the structure of the velocity and acceleration fields over the rotating body. For velocities we have simply,.

The acceleration, on the other hand, is composed of the two pieces:. When working with n-t coordinates, care must be taken to ensure that a consistence choice of tangent vectors is made as two conventions exist for rotational quantities in the plane. The two differ in the first taking counter-clockwise rotations to be positive, which is recommended,.

In either case, must be tangent to the path of the point of interest and point in the direction of increasing. Observe that when polar coordinates are used, the coordinates of a point of a rotating body are determined by its angular displacement alone:. Therefore, in order to describe the motion of A , all that is necessary is a determination of for all time during the motion. Now, as angular velocity and angular acceleration describe the rotation of any line in the body, we have the relations.

Given or , therefore, techniques developed previously can be applied to integrate these to determine and the motion of A. We proceed now to develop techniques to analyze the motion of rigid bodies in contact.

We consider two contacting rigid bodies, and assume that no sliding occurs at the contacting surfaces.

Let A and B be points, one on each of the rigid bodies, instantaneously in contact. As contact takes place without slipping, the velocity of A relative to B must vanish, or. An example of this form of contact is that between gears in a gear train: spur, bevel, helical or worm gears. In our consideration of planar motion, however, we are limited to analyzing contact between gears that have a common axis of rotation.

Consider the motion of instantaneously contacting points A and B , each on one of a pair of interlocking gears.

Kinematics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies pdf writer

Applying our contact relationship to A and B , we have. However, as we have,. Taking time derivatives, we obtain a relationship between the accelerations of points A and B ,. Contact of this form is encountered in belt, rope, and chain drives of all kinds, as well as between rack and pinion gears.

As before, consider the motion of instantaneously contacting points, A on the rotating body, and B on the translating one. As the two points must have identical absolute velocities, the velocity of point B must be directed along , tangent to the path of A. With the case of planar fixed axis rotation dealt with, we turn now to the more complex situation of general plane motion.

Recall, once again, that the motion of an arbitrary rigid body can be reduced to the superposition of a translation and a fixed axis rotation. Handling the translation of a rigid body is trivial, all points of the body move with the same velocity and acceleration, and we now know how to deal with fixed axis rotations. Therefore, all that remains is to understand how the two are superposed.

As we will find out, this is quite simple. We proceed by returning to the equations we had derived for the arbitrary motion of a rigid body. Recall that these related the velocity and acceleration of a point A in the body to the translational motion of an arbitrary reference point B and , and the absolute rotational motion of the body and as,.

As in the case of fixed axis rotation we simplify these expressions by introducing a set of n-t coordinates.

Unlike those used previously, however, the coordinates introduced here refer to the motion of A relative to the reference at B. Therefore, is directed towards point B , the center of the relative motion, and is directed along , tangent to the path of A relative to B. Therefore, like the velocity, the acceleration of A is a superposition of translational and rotational components. While the normal component is directed along , towards the axis of the rotational motion of A relative to B , the tangential component is directed along , tangent to the path of A relative to B.